CRASH Charity Impact Report 2016-17

We are proud to publish CRASH Charity Impact Report 2016-17 which highlights how our partnership with our Patron Companies and the Construction Industry has made a real and lasting difference to people who are homeless or receiving end of life care.

CRASH receives no Government funding, with a team of five full time staff, the charity relies entirely on the support of the industry to undertake the charity’s valuable work.

During the last financial year (April 2016 to March 2017) CRASH helped 45 homelessness and hospice charities across the UK with their building projects by providing:

• £246,207 worth of professional skills and advice 

• £133,894 worth of building materials

• £311,635 worth of cash grants made possible through Patron donations and fundraising

• 93% of charities supported said they had seen a significant improvement in their environment 

• which in turn helped more than 17,266 people*

CRASH Chief Executive Francesca Roberts says:

“Patron companies underpin every aspect of CRASH, and over the past 21 years, the charity has become an exciting and effective partnership of the corporate and the charitable sectors. What CRASH achieves is only possible thanks to the efforts of the industry to help people when they are most in need.”

Whilst CRASH focuses on helping charities with their buildings, it is important to remember that our ultimate beneficiaries are vulnerable, homeless people and those young and old receiving end of life care.  93% of charities supported said they had seen a significant improvement in their environment which in turn helped more than 17,266 people*

The Impact Report contains two examples St Peter & St James Hospice and Emmaus Community Dover which demonstrate the results that can be achieved working in such a focused and practical way.   Further examples can be found at www.crash.org.uk/our-work-with-homelessness-hospice-charities/

*These figures are sourced directly from the charities and relate to the building project that CRASH. They include homeless men and women and patients benefiting from hospice services but do not include staff, volunteers or other carers.